Guide to Work, Study, Travel and Living Abroad  FacebookTwitterGoogle+  
Asia Issue Focus:
Travel, Study, Work, Teaching, Volunteering, and Living
Featured TAzine Articles
Riding an elephant in Laos
We waited a long time to go to Laos. A small and much-abused country, used as a dumping ground for bombs during the American war, Laos has kept a low profile during its recovery. Now we anticipated elephants, caves, temples, and Buddhas. We were not disappointed... Read more
How and Why to Study for a Master’s Degree in Southeast Asia by Nathan Edgerton
(1st Place Study Abroad Writing Contest Winner)
Study for Master's Degree in Southeast Asia
After living, traveling, and teaching in Southeast Asia for five years, I realized that if I wanted to open up options for other kinds of employment besides teaching English, it would be a good idea to continue my studies for a master’s degree. With apprehension, I made some initial investigations into returning to the USA to study. Visiting website after website, I went straight to the “tuition and fees” page and found figures around $35,000 per year and up. After tacking on living expenses, I knew I’d likely spend well over $55,000 per year. Given the uncertain economic situation in the states, I was reluctant to deplete my savings and even take on debt. Fortunately, I knew there were other options... Read more
Cooking in Vietnam
Rural Vietnam is a wonderland for adventurous food lovers. Throughout the countryside, fresh, local ingredients and flavorful meals are the norm, with recipes passed down from generation to generation. One of the best ways to learn the essence of Vietnam’s regional specialties is to enroll in classes with native chefs. On a recent 1-month trip to Vietnam, I did just that—participating in a cooking class in Sapa and then on Cat Ba Island... Read more
Chiang Mai temple, Thailand
Recently voted one of the friendliest cities in the world, Chiang Mai is a fantastic place to dip your toes into the world of teaching English. The relaxed environment and low-key attitude make for a gentle introduction to TEFL for those just starting out. Though you’ll enjoy your time in northern Thailand, your salary will also reflect the laid-back atmosphere. You won’t make a fortune teaching. But that should not dissuade you. Chiang Mai is a cheap place to live... Read more
Chiang Mai street food Thailand
The morning after I arrived in Bangkok, I left the apartment where I was staying, wandered down a small street until it intersected and ended at a major street, and was met with the cacophony and aromas of street carts packing the sidewalks on either side... Read more
Bangkok boat
The morning after I arrived in Bangkok, I left the apartment where I was staying, wandered down a small street until it intersected and ended at a major street, and was met with the cacophony and aromas of street carts packing the sidewalks on either side... Read more
Thailand gold statues
...We will make a comparison of some of the key aspects of each country that can make living and teaching a memorable and rewarding experience... Read more
Living in Korea as EFL Couple
...We will make a comparison of some of the key aspects of each country that can make living and teaching a memorable and rewarding experience... Read more
Living in Singapore as an Expatriate
...Expats in Singapore fall into two major categories. There are the well-paid foreigners from Britain, Australia, the United States, China, India, and other countries...Then there are the low paid foreign workers. The combination of these two groups has created a massive increase in foreigners working in Singapore... Read more
Living in and Teaching in HCMC, Vietnam
...HCMC, the central part of which is still referred to as Saigon, is a frenetic city by anyone’s estimation. Capitalism and communism come together to form an intriguing blend of perspectives. Across the city, temples jostle for space with shopping malls. Street food vendors hawk their wares outside fantastically expensive office blocks... Read more
Teaching English in Hanoi
My wife and I had already been teaching English (in South America and Africa) for a few years when we decided to try to venture out East. Vietnam was very appealing: most schools insisted on CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages); the hours were not that bad; and salaries were exceptional. It was almost too good to be true... Read more
Internship in Jaipur, India
The author describes her internship in the "Pink City" of Jaipur, India via the very popular and reputed AIESEC program. She expands upon how she discovered the internships option and offers tips to interns taking the plunge to live and work in India... Read more
Cooking in India
“Come, come in, and sit down,” she said with a kind, shy smile. “My name is Shashi and I will be your teacher. I hope you’re ready to learn and eat.”... Read more
Festival in India
Nothing can quite prepare you the Kumbh Mela, the planet’s biggest religious gathering. It is a time when millions of Hindu pilgrims come together to bathe ceremoniously in India’s holiest rivers... Read more
Prayer flags in Lhasa
Perched atop the green hills that rise above Dharamsala valley sits the surprisingly busy village of Mcleod Ganj, home to the Tibetan government in exile and the residence of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. Flanked by the snow-capped Himalaya mountains and filled with countless courses and activities at a minuscule price, the little town has also attracted a significant population of expatriate volunteers and students of Buddhist philosophy... Read more
Bonfires in Dharamsala by students
Monday to Friday Western volunteers lead groups of Tibetan students in conversation groups in the front yard of the Center. Participation is on a day-by-day basis and group size varies each day depending on the ratio of Tibetans to volunteers. For one hour a topic is focused on, with subjects varying widely from Buddhism to politics, life and love, and the Tibetan New Year. We warm ourselves around a bonfire afterwards as one Tibetan from each group reports on their topic as part of their English training... Read more
Columns by Contributing Editors
TAzine Editorial
In this issue of TAzine we cover a selection of travel, study, work, volunteer, internship, and other possibilities in Asia which are part of our core mission as an educational travel resource, in the broadest sense. Asia as a contintent offers many options, from secluded low-cost budget pastoral life in Southeast Asia, to teaching English in "happening" small cities such as Chiang Mai, to Internships in large cities in China, to low-cost study in Southeast Asia, to living in high-priced technologically advanced cities such as Singapore, Tokyo, Shanghai, and many more.

In this vast region cultural immersion travel options are available almost everywhere, though language understanding can be a challenge. There are an enormous amount of jobs teaching English, and many internships are now available in countries such as China, with most of them offering the chance to learn Mandarin Chinese.

As always, while enjoyment is often a primary motivation, we urge all travelers to follow the "golden rule" when traveling in accordance with our editorial since 1977. Please try to ensure that your money remains in the local community and respect those who are hosting you in their "home" country.

Sadly, this has been a year of major natural disasters in the region, and we urge all who can to donate and/or volunteer if you can to help in the recovery or economic development or redevelopment. You will learn much in the process while eventually helping the people who need it most, such as in the Philippines, which suffered the horrible Typhoon Haiyan and needs long-term funding and attention. Aid agencies often produce the best results, though there are many opportunities for volunteers.

TAzine is a monthly Webzine which continues the 30-year tradition started by Transitions Abroad magazine. TAzine features many of the same columnists who wrote for the magazine, a growing group of new columnists, while featuring talented freelance writers who wish to share their experiences and expertise within the context of our pioneering coverage of work, study, travel, and living abroad.

Founded in 1977 by Dr. Clayton Allen Hubbs, Transitions Abroad magazine was the only print publication dedicated to work, study, living, volunteering, and immersion travel abroad. Its purpose—in print and now as a Webzine—is the dissemination of practical information leading to a greater understanding of other cultures through direct participation in the daily life of the host community.

Lies Ouwerkerk
Lies takes you inside a sacred festival in the “world’s last Shangri-la," as Bhutan often has been dubbed, and provides an in-depth and illustrated explanation of the colorful dances and rituals... Read More
Venturing Along With the Nomads of Mongolia’s Wild West
Independent Travel Columnist Lies Ouwerkerk
Lies Ouwerkerk
Lies wanders with a Mongolian tribe and immerses herself, to the extent possible, in a ritualized life which is at once simple yet full of symbolism, purity, and beauty. She is taken into the yurt she helps build, and is fed, told stories while witnessing events held by her very hosts, and generally treated with a hospitality that is hard to imagine living in such rugged lands... Read More
Travel in Sacred Myanmar
Independent Travel Columnist Lies Ouwerkerk
Lies Ouwerkerk
When you travel to Myanmar, the key is to choose private tour operators and family-owned establishments. In this way, government-owned businesses are largely bypassed and the people of Myanmar—one third of whom are still living below the poverty line—receive some tourist dollars and exposure to the outside world... Read More
The Paradox that is Kolkata, India
Independent Travel Columnist Lies Ouwerkerk
Lies Ouwerkerk
Kolkata (called Calcutta until 2001) became my travel hub four times in a row in one year, when visiting Bhutan, Sikkim, Orissa, and Myanmar. Since there were never connecting flights at the hours I arrived, I found myself repeatedly wandering through this once second largest city of the British Empire, asking myself: “does this feel like a dying city or a city of joy?”... Read More
India’s Andaman Islands: Remote, Rare and Rustic
Senior Travel Editor Alison Gardner
Alison Gardner
Alison and her husband embark on a voyage to India's Andaman islands, a respite from their busy life in Kolkata. The trip reveals very beautiful islands and lands, an extremely rich and ancient cultural history, along with an unexpected adventure... Read More
10 Ways Women Can Stay Safe in India
Women's Travel Columnist Beth Whitman
Beth Whitman
In recent years it has become more and more acceptable for women to travel without their husbands, significant others, or children. However, this trend does not mean that women are all traveling solo. While I have enjoyed my solo travels tremendously and I am a big advocate of women hitting the road on their own, I have also experienced the immense joy of traveling with other women... Read More
Travel: A Lifelong Journey of Learning
Wandering Educator Contributing Editor Dr. Jessie Voigts
Jesse Voights
Remember that first time you were confronted with extreme difference? It might have been when you were small, surrounded by a cacophony of words in a different language, or while you were a teen, backpacking Europe and trying to figure out the train systems... Read More
How to Be an Ugly American
How to Enjoy the World Columnist Robert Reid
Robert Reid
In his new column, prolific traveler and travel writer Robert Reid both brings to light the historical stereotype and debunks the myth of the 'Ugly American' traveler while exploring an image that no longer applies, even using worldwide surveys to support his observations... Read More
John Clites
John Clites' details the five primary types of EFL jobs available abroad as well non-teaching jobs that utilize many of the same skills... Read More
How to Manage Your Finances at Home While Living Abroad
Professional Hobo Columnist Nora Dunn
Nora Dunn
"When you're living abroad for a time, how do you arrange your affairs and manage your finances at home? Issues like accessing money, managing payments, paying taxes, and dealing with property can seem overwhelming. Here are some options and tips for how to manage your finances at home while living abroad." Read More
Book Review
Moon Living in India
Moon Living Abroad in India by Margot Bigg

"Author Margot Bigg, a journalist and dual U.S. and UK citizen, has lived in New Delhi for several years, and the insights she shares in her book are based on her own experiences of moving to India..." Read more
Featured Programs
Volunteer in Vietnam with Experiential Learning International (ELI)

Volunteer in Vietnam with ELI

Volunteer with a community based organization in Vietnam! ELI works with organizations in Ho Chi Minh City, the Mekong Delta, and Da Lat to create volunteer opportunities that benefit the locals while giving volunteers a unique cultural experience while giving back to the communities. Possible projects include teaching, HIV/AIDS education, women's issues, health projects, community development, and more. All placements are set up on an individual basis according to the needs of the local organization and the specific skills of the volunteer.

Current Issue and Focus:
Travel, Study, Work, Teaching, Volunteering, and Living in Asia
Previous Issue and Focus:
Travel, Study, Work, Teaching, Volunteering and Living in Latin America
Webzine cover for Asia 2014
Webzine Cover for Latin America 2013
To view all TAzine back issues, see our archive.
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