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An Agriturismo in Italy

Experience Italian Cultural Immersion on an Italian Farm

An agriturismo in Sicily
Relaxing at an agriturismo in Italy.

There are hundreds of farms and rural homes in all parts of Italy that welcome travelers. Agriturismos (agriturismi in Italian) offer guests a first-hand opportunity to experience local culture as well as a chance to sample home-cooked regional foods and to sleep in authentic country homes, many furnished with local antiques. They are an inexpensive yet culturally rich alternative to hotels.

Some of our more interesting stays were at agriturismos with English speaking hosts, with whom we had many enjoyable conversations. At the agriturismo Trinita, the owner showed us his exotic garden on the slopes of Mt. Etna. He produced grapes, citrus fruits, and wonderful preserves and jellies in the shadow of Europe’s most active volcano.

Another memorable stay was at an agriturismo in Italy’s province of Marche. The owners of Azienda Caravanserraglio were a Renaissance couple in a province rich with Renaissance history. She was a Dutch art curator who had designed the website, took care of bookings and guest relations, and decorated the beautiful rooms. He was a jack-of-all-trades who planted the gardens, cooked gourmet meals for guests, and designed and built the impressive accomodations.

Agriturismo association websites give the traveler a chance to see a picture of the property, find out a little about the accomodations area, and get a price quote. Actual bookings usually must be made by phone, but agriturismos in more popular parts of Italy often have their own websites or email addresses for bookings.

Most agriturismos charge between $50-$100 per person for one night, including breakfast. Half board can run another $15-50, and often includes fresh country wine. What one gets at particular agriturismos varies considerably, although the best values are usually in rural areas.

For more information, visit the following websites to start: www.agriturismo.com, www.agriturist.it, and www.agriturismo.it/en/farmhouse/sicily.

Editor's note: See the TransitionsAbroad.com section on Agriturismi in Italy for much more info. Note that there are a very wide variety of agriturismi, some catering to those seeking a more rustic holiday, while others tend to be more on the luxurious end, often including swimming pools, horseback riding, guides, and much more. You obviously pay in accordance with the amenities offered.

JOHN TENNANT lives in Elkridge, MD.

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